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for the wealthy and quote, sticks the middle class with the bill. so with 29 days to go until the fiscal cliff, what would it take to get a deal? joining me now, men on opposite sides, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform and robert reish, former secretary of labor for president bill clinton and the author of "beyond outrage." none of the three of us are beyond outrage, grover norquist, which is why i keep having you back. the situation it seems to me as an impartial observer here is that both sides have now made fairly ludicrous offers that they know the other side is never going to accept in a million years. that does beg the question, grover, why bother, given that both sides know where they need to move, why the games? >> well, it's not clear that both sides know. the week after the election, president obama was asked do you have to have the higher rates or could we have deductions and credits and he said he was open to negotiations. three weeks later, after thanksgiving, he shows up and all of a sudden there's a line in the sand on rates that had come out of nowhere, so
president obama has seen these polls. so if there is a fiscal cliff and we go over it, the american public are likely to blame the republicans. >> well, that's absolutely true, piers. we've had an election and the clearest debate and the clearest difference in that election was over the question of whether the rich should pay more and tax rates should go up on the rich. everybody who paid any attention at all knows that the top 2% are now taking home a larger share of total income and wealth in this country than they have in over 80 years and are paying the lowest effective tax rate they paid in over a half a century. we also have a looming budget deficit. so you don't have to really be a rocket scientist to understand that the rich do have to pay more. taxes do have to be raised on the rich and i think that's why over 60% of the public in these polls are not only supportive of a tax increase on the rich, but also will blame the republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. and this gives frankly, this gives the white house and this gives the obama administration much more bargaining leverag
for these fiscal cliff talks. back to your phone calls. good morning, doris. caller: good morning. the plan that the republicans offered, this is just the romney-ryan plan that the american voters said no to. other than destroying our earned benefit, i do not call them entitlements because we worked hard and we earned them. there are no specifics. what loopholes will they close? of course, they are going to punish the poor and middle- class. their plan still gives another huge tax cut to the 1%. people need to look at what happened to this country between fdr and nixon. look at what happened with the conservative takeover from nixon until now. host: we are going to have congressman tom cole from oklahoma who last week said in a closed-door meeting that they should agree with president obama and extend the tax cuts for middle-class americans and then fight later on for that tax cut for the wealthy. we will ask him about this latest proposal, the counterproposal from the house republicans. j.d. on twitter says -- on our republican , richard from colorado springs, colorado. caller: c-span coul
've got a fiscal cliff now. we have the fiscal abyss next year. we need to say, don't come home. no deal, no break. members should be in washington at least five days a week like every other american and not leave until they deal with the fiscal cliff this year or until we get a grand bargain next year. they would pull off seven times more days -- >> david faber tweeted this morning that they should be locked in a room and forced to listen to the animal orchestra until they have a deal. >> david faber's hair. >> you put them in a room. you tell them they're going to sit there until the deal is done. day three, no more food. day five, no water. day seven, the waterboarding begins. that would get it done. >> and the president should be there, too. >> the president does work five days a week. >> but not in the same room. but he is home. he's already home. >> but listen, they spend too much time raising money. if they did a good job, they wouldn't have to raise as many money. if they got paid for performance, they wouldn't have any money. >> are you going to run for linda mcmahon's seat? >>
the fiscal cliff. eye roncally enough, something the house of representatives passed last may. in april set out a tax plan. in may passed a sequestration plan, went to the senate and said we're going to see you in the lame duck time period. we're in the lame duck and this had has to be solved. we have to solve the problem. the first thing is to define what the problem even is. it seems one group is talking about the real problems, the fiscal cliff, and the other group is talking about the real problem, the debt and deficit. what is the real issue? we have $16.3 trillion in debt as a nation. $1 trillion of overspending or each year for the last four years. let me set the example of what this really means. in 2007, our tax revenue, how much we were bringing in the treasury, is almost exactly what it is in 2012. from 2007 to 2012, the revenue is almost identical. the difference is our spending has gone up $1 trillion a year. from 2007 to 2012. so over the course of that time it's slowly built up. but each year we've been over $1 trillion in spending. while our revenue has stayed consistent bas
up on the wealthiest americans. and i don't really see them doing that. >> if the republicans say sorry, no way are we going to raise rates on the wealthy, you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> if republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a time when the american economy is doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> but house speaker john bigger is digging in himself, admitting talks are going nowhere. speaker boehner also described the moment when secretary geithner first showed him the president's opening offer. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said, "you can't be serious." i've just never seen anything like it. you know, we've got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. right now i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)